Tag Archives: Chicago Cutlery 62S

Local Chicago Cutlery Knife Sharpening

Chicago Cutlery Sharpening Service in Mobile Alabama

I absolutely love Chicago Cutlery knives. But, the very reason I like them might make them inappropriate for you. Why? Because they wear down and dull easily and they are pretty easy to bend too. What some may see as negatives – the wearing and bending – can be a definite plus for you as it is for me if you are willing to put just a little more care into your knives. Let me explain:

Chicago Cutlery knives are made of steel that might be just a wee bit softer than other knife steels and the blades are much thinner than what some cooks like – but these are the advantages I am talking about. Softer and thinner blades allow the knives to be quickly sharpened and they can be sharpened to a much finer cutting angle than knives normally found in the typical kitchen.

I have just finished sharpening three Chicago Cutlery knives for a customer; a 65S, a 62S and a 72S. When the customer dropped them off they were so worn that they really did not have a cutting edge. Since these blades are thin, I was able to profile the cutting edge to twelve degrees. Now that is sharp! A straight razor is sharpened at ten to twelve degrees. And, it was easy to do because the steel is, as I said, a bit softer than many kitchen knives.

I know you’ve seen people cutting a sheet of paper or a newspaper to show how sharp a knife is. If you really want to see sharp, try cutting a napkin. A napkin is so soft it is impossible to cut with anything less than a razor edge. Take the knife to be tested and use its point to punch a hole in the napkin. Then, very slowly, see if the knife will cut the napkin without leaving a jagged edge. If so, that is what you can call sharp.

Here are a couple of pictures showing these knives cutting a napkin. It is not so easy to see, but look for the cutting line running from each hole.

Sharpening Chicago Cutlery

Sharpening Chicago Cutlery

Sharpening Chicago Cutlery

Sharpening Chicago Cutlery

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Published: March 21, 2017 | Comments: 0

Knife Sharpening In Mobile Alabama

Chicago Cutlery Knife Sharpening in Mobile Alabama

Knife Sharpening In Mobile Alabama

 

I like Chicago Cutlery knives. These knives get mixed reviews from both collectors, home cooks and professional chefs and the reviews lean towards the positive. The knives are made of a soft and tough steel which, in my opinion, makes them a work horse for the average kitchen. They are easily maintained and seldom damaged.

Like pretty much everything else today, manufacturing of knives has moved to countries outside the U.S. with very few exceptions. There is a consensus that knives made overseas today are not of the same quality as the older knives made in America. I have not taken a side in this debate as I have always had a tendency to prefer older models of just about all cutting instruments. I even cling to a fondness for old carbon steel knives that rust like crazy but I just clean ’em up and put them to good use.

Now back to the subject of Chicago Cutlery knives. I recently received 4 Chicago Cutlery knives for sharpening from a local customer. The knives were of the sturdier, older variety which made me eager to sharpen and restore the knives to the condition and capability they inherently possessed.

The customer delivered 4 Chicago Tradition Series Knives:

  • Chicago Cutlery 42S – 8″ Chef Knife
  • Chicago Cutlery 61S – 6″ Boning/Utility Knife
  • Chicago Cutlery 62S – 5″ Flexible Filet/Boning Knife
  • Chicago Cutlery 100S – 3″ Paring Knife

All the knives are made of 1095 high carbon stainless steel, the same steel used to make the U.S. Marine Corp Kabars and all have walnut handles. The overall condition of the knives was typical of well used kitchen knives – dry slabs and in need of sharpening. As I suspected, the knives had a single bevel edge of approximately 20° which is pretty close to the 25° standard factory edge. As with any kitchen knife though, a single beveled edge dulls quickly and the more it is sharpened the quicker it will dull. All of the knives had a different cutting edge bevel for the last inch or two at the point end. I am guessing the change in bevel is because the knives had been sharpened previously only on the long straight edge.

The course of action I took with this customers knives was to take the time to re-profile the blades to include a relief edge of 15° and a secondary edge of 19°. After setting the relief and secondary edges, I de-burred the edges with a ceramic stick until the secondary edge was scary sharp and finished the edge with a leather strop.

My final action for these knives was an application of olive oil to the walnut handles and a minor buffing of the brass rivets – all followed with an application of beeswax and polishing.

I am recommending that this customer keep the edge sharp by using nothing but a ceramic stick. Four or 5 quick strokes on ceramic should keep the knives sharp for a good while. When the edge can no longer be maintained with the ceramic it is probably time for another visit to Super Sharp Shop.

Chicago Cutlery Knife Sharpening in Mobile Alabama

Chicago Cutlery Knife Sharpening in Mobile Alabama

Due to the heavy rain I worked inside. That proved to be a mistake. When my wife noticed I was sharpening yet another batch of Chicago Cutlery, she added a few of her own to the batch. Here along with the customer’s knives are those from our kitchen. You may notice there is one Old Hickory carbon steel knife and one filet knife in the batch.

Your customer review would be appreciated. (CLICK HERE)

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Published: June 1, 2015