Tag Archives: hand saw sharpening

Harvey W Peace Handsaw Sharpening

Harvey W Peace Handsaw
Harvey W Peace Handsaw

Harvey W Peace Handsaw

I will sharpen anything you bring me–maybe with the exception of balloons and bubbles. There is, for me at least, a lot of satisfaction in putting things right again. I do love restoring the older things but unless I am already familiar with them, they prove to be a huge distraction. Some times I will spend hours researching a tool brought to me so I will know everything I can before I start on it. The saw shown in the picture to the left is an example of a distraction. I knew right away, when Woody, the customer, handed me the saw, it was special.

Harvey W Peace

Harvey W Peace

This saw was made by Harvey W. Peace in Brooklyn, NY. I would guess it is a late 1800’s or early 1900’s saw. You may be interested in how this saw was manufactured and why there is such a difference between today’s “throw-away” saws and an older generation saw. For the story of of Harvey W. Peace manufacturing go to this site.

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Published: September 7, 2018 | Comments: 0

Vintage Hand Saw Sharpening Service

hand saw sharpening service

Sharpening An Old Panel Saw

 

Super Sharp Shop Hand Saw Sharpening Service

Super Sharp Shop Hand Saw Sharpening Service

Handsaws like the one pictured in this post have blades of spring steel with wooden handles attached. They come in a variety of sizes from about 20″ to over 30″. They are generally used for cutting stock boards. Saws on the shorter end of the scale are often referred to as panel saws; they make excellent toolbox saws and are easier to use in tight spaces or when sawing at an odd angle. However being shorter, they cut less wood per stroke.

Handsaws can have teeth that are filed for either rip cuts or cross cuts. Rip saws are used for cutting with the grain the wood, along the length of the board, and crosscut saws are for cutting across the grain of the board. Rip teeth are shaped like tiny chisels. Crosscut teeth are shaped like little knives. Tooth size is measured in teeth per inch, TPI. The higher the TPI the smaller the teeth. Other things being equal, a saw with finer teeth will cut the same board slower than a saw with coarser teeth but will leave a better cut.

A crosscut handsaw between 7-10 TPI is a very good all-around saw and does a good job on boards around one inch thick, leaving a decent surface but cutting quickly. For rip saws, between 5-7 TPI is a good all-around size for working with one-inch boards.

 

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Published: September 7, 2018